Phoenix Suns History

The Phoenix Suns entered the NBA entering the 1968-69 season as an expansion franchise, the same year the Milwaukee Bucks entered the league. The team wasted no time floundering as a young expansion team as they made the playoffs their second year of existence. In fact, the Suns frequently made the playoffs en route to one of the NBA’s best winning percentages. These playoff trips include two Western Conference Finals victories in 1976 and 1993, but both of these seasons ended with losses in the NBA Finals. In order to make this type of playoff consistency possible the Suns frequently boasted very talented teams, including some MVP award winners. In 1993 Charles Barkley won the award while Steve Nash claimed the tittle in both 2004 and 2005. The Steve Nash led teams often appeared Finals bound, however the San Antonio Spurs frequently eliminated the team from the playoffs before they could make it deep into the playoffs.

Phoenix Suns Ownership

Over most of the team’s history Jerry Colangelo has been the owner the Suns. Very few of Colangelo’s teams missed the playoffs, as he was a good judge of talent and good basketball minds. He may not be a favorite with all Suns fans because he would let superstars walk, like hometown favorite Jason Kidd, if off the court issues ever became a distraction. In 2004 Colangelo sold the team to Robert Sarver for just over $400 million. Sarver has gained a reputation of being a frugal owner, unwilling to spend to money in order to for the team to succeed. Many of the stars Sarver inherited have left because Sarver was unwilling to pay them top dollar and he has not brought in any suitable replacements.

Phoenix Suns Arena

The U.S. Airways Center, previously the American West Arena, has been home to the Suns since it opened for business in 1992. The Arena features purple seats due to the Suns team colors and as a result is sometimes called the “Purple Palace.” In addition to Suns’ games the arena is also used for the WNBA’s Phoenix Murcury, the AFL’s Arizona Rattlers, and many other entertainment activities. For Suns home games the arena is capable of holding 18,422 people when the stadium is full.

Phoenix Suns Fan Base

Suns fans have normally been loyal to their team, with good reason since their team rarely had poor seasons. Now that the franchise is going through a rebuilding period fans appear frustrated. After seeing many of their stars shipped away like Amar’e Stoudemire, Shawn Marion, and Steve Nash, fans may be losing faith in the team. This is evident from much lower attendance numbers than the team is use to.

Phoenix Suns Coaching

The Suns have had many winning coaches, which makes sense considering the franchises great winning percentage. The only reason that most of the coaches do not have long careers in Phoenix is that lack of playoff victories. Both Cotton Fitzsimmons and Mike D’Antoni won NBA coach of the year awards while they were with the team. The Suns’ current coach is Alvin Gentry. Gentry held stints with three other teams including the Heat, Pistons, and Clippers. All of these coaching opportunities were terminated because of poor team performance. Gentry had success in Phoenix during his first few seasons, however as his team leaked talent his record has decreased with it.

Phoenix Suns Betting

After many years of playoff contention, current Suns teams appear to be in a rebuilding mode that Suns fans may not be accustomed to. While previous Suns teams may have appeared to be good bets to win the NBA Finals or Western Conference Finals, the current team would be a stretch to win at best. Without any star players the Suns seem like a much better bet to win the NBA draft lottery than the Finals or ever their division. However if the Suns can put together a decent team in the near future their division has a lot of potential, but may not have a perennial winner, leaving an opportunity for the Suns to improve and contend for the division. For this to happen though, the team would have to quickly improve for this to be possible.

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